CRIMINAL CHARGES DROPPED, GUNS RETURNED TO NEB. MAN HELPED BY SAF

BELLEVUE, WA – Criminal charges have been dropped against a Nebraska man whose expensive firearms collection was seized in a case involving a misdemeanor conviction some years ago for carrying a knife that was an eighth-inch too long, and the Second Amendment Foundation was delighted to assist in the effort.

Kevin Williams of Lincoln was prosecuted under a local ordinance, but when the case came to trial, the case was dropped and his firearms were returned, noted SAF founder and Executive Vice President Alan M. Gottlieb.

“When we learned of this case,” he said, “we couldn’t resist getting involved. When somebody faces losing his firearms collection over an old misdemeanor conviction because he had a knife blade that was a fraction of an inch too long, that just seems silly. Turns out we were right.”

“This wrongful prosecution should never have begun,” noted attorney David Sigale of Glen Allyn, Ill., who took the case for SAF. “We are pleased that Mr. Williams is out of criminal jeopardy, and that the government has relinquished its forfeiture claim on Mr. William’s constitutionally protected property. This is a reminder that the Constitution and Second Amendment apply all throughout Nebraska.”

Gottlieb noted that even in a pro-rights state like Nebraska, there can be a bad law on the books that results in a conviction that has long-reaching ramifications.

“Mr. Williams’ substantial gun collection is being returned,” Gottlieb said. “While this case may not seem important, it is one more small step in our legal efforts to protect firearms freedom. We spent several thousand dollars on this case because it was the right thing to do. We’re grateful to members and supporters whose generous contributions make it possible for us to get involved in cases like this.”


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